From the story, "On a Holland ranch, vestiges of a sea of grass," in the Temple Daily Telegram:

In about 1859, an awestruck New York journalist got his first look at the prairie grass that once blanketed much of Central Texas.

“We came out suddenly, as if a curtain had risen, upon a broad prairie, reaching in swells like the ocean after a great storm,” wrote Frederick Law Olmsted (who would later design New York City’s Central Park).

Remnants of this legendary sea of grass that covered Central Texas several millennia before Europeans arrived with their steel tools, turning the soil, and later fencing the prairie, can still be found in parts of Bell County today.

You just have to know where to look.

During fall and winter, a bunch grass commonly called little bluestem is easily identified – even to city folk.  ….

Read the full story at the Temple Daily Telegram.

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